MOTEVENTURE’S “THIS…OR THAT? THE FAVORITE THINGS EDITION”

“Working with Julie Andrews is like getting hit over the head with a Valentine.”

Christopher Plummer

“My favorite things in life don’t cost any money. It’s really clear that the most precious resource we all have is time.”

Steve Jobs

“The music and lyrics of Rodgers & Hammerstein connect seamlessly. Singing those beautiful songs was a joyous experience for me, and one that I will never forget.”

Julie Andrews

Nuns, Nazis, and singing. Lots of singing. 1965’s “The Sound of Music” spun out a number of classic songs, from the title track to “Edelweiss”, “Do-Re-Mi”, “Maria”, and “Climb Ev’ry Mountain” to name a few. There’s also a tune called “My Favorite Things” featured in the film that has always left me pondering how a song from a non-Christmas themed movie became a Christmas staple on radio years later.

My research (thank you Billboard) unraveled the mystery. In 1961, prior to filming the movie, star Julie Andrews performed the song (from the Broadway musical) on a Garry Moore holiday special. Jack Jones however was the first to record and include it on The Jack Jones Christmas Album in 1964. Andrews herself didn’t include it on her 1967 Christmas Treasure release. It has since been recorded by everyone from Johnny Mathis to Mary J. Blige.

Today let’s work together to discover the most favorite thing from amongst the list of “The Sound of Music’s” favorite things.

Before you vote, here are some fascinating facts about those famous favorite things:

  • The Juliet Rose sold for $15.8 million in 2006, making it the world’s most expensive.
  • A kitten’s whiskers are as long as their body is wide.
  • The first kettles were likely cast iron rather than copper and were used to boil wort for making beer and to mash grain.
  • Cave paintings suggest that humans wore mittens, possibly knitted, during the ice age.
  • Around 50% of recipients don’t like the gift they receive (whether it’s tied up with strings or not).
  • A pony’s memory is better than that of an elephant.
  • ‘Apple strudel’ is also known as ‘Apfelstrudel’, which is the German term for the dessert, while ‘strudel’ is German for ‘swirl’ or ‘whirl’.
  • Aunt Clara on the television series “Bewitched” had an odd hobby of collecting doorbells, as did Marion Lorne, the actress who portrayed her.
  • What is Schnitzel with Noodles? Two Chums have got you covered here.
  • Wild geese always form a wedge when flying. This form of flock helps thin the air behind the first birds and makes it easier for everyone else to fly.
  • Queen Victoria started the trend of wearing a white wedding dress in the mid-19th century, and Hollywood and royal brides have followed suit. Today, it’s a matrimonial classic.
  • Although some snowflakes might appear the same on the surface, it would be incredibly rare for them to take exactly the same route from the sky and be identical on a molecular level.
  • Chionophobia is the persistent fear of snow (and silver white winters), especially becoming trapped by snow. The term is derived from the Greek words chion and phobos, meaning “snow” and “fear,” respectively.

With those thoughts in mind and the holiday season upon us, “This…or That?” this week will unscientifically determine the most favorite of our “favorite things”.

While you consider your decision, watch a few videos highlighting (or parodying) the classic song.

Now, you simply choose your favorite thing below (this or that…or that…or that…or that) and view the results!

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To participate in our other “This…or That?” polls, simply click HERE and choose which one you want to take part in.

The Uncommon Christmas Song of the Day

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